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Moore Charitable Foundation
Moore Charitable Foundation

Protecting Green Seat Turtles by Banning Shark Finning

According to Oceana Fact Sheet, sharks are caught and killed faster than they can reproduce. In fact, scientists estimate sharks are killed, on average, 30 percent faster than they can replace themselves, and because of this, nearly one in four species are threatened with extinction.

The loss of an apex predator like a shark to an ecosystem has catastrophic results – the beginnings of which can now be seen appearing throughout Bahamian waters. Vast patches of “underwater fields” that were once filled¬†with swaying turtle grass¬†blanketing the sea bed now stand barren, empty, and without a green sea turtle in sight.

Learn more about how the declining shark population is directly – and dangerously – affecting the green sea turtle’s primary food source, and therefore thrusting their population into a dangerous balance caused by dwindling food.

DISCOVER MORE
Protecting Grand Bahama's Spotted Eagle Ray Population

Protecting Grand Bahama's Spotted Eagle Ray Population
The downside of Grand Bahama's booming eco-tourism industry on the dwindling spotted eagle ray communities.

Saving Tobacco Cay's Flamingo Tongues

Saving Tobacco Cay's Flamingo Tongues
Learn more about Tobacco Cay's new initiatives to protect their Flamingo Tongue population.

Moore Charitable Foundation

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