Louis Bacon’s Moore Charitable Foundation establishes Science-to-Action Fund at Princeton University

Posted April 1, 2016

PRINCETON, NJ In a unique effort to combine the expertise of university scientists and conservation organizations, Louis Bacon’s Moore Charitable Foundation has pledged $1.25 million to establish the Science-to-Action Fund at Princeton University. The fund will support environmental research that advances scientific understanding and practical, on-the-ground solutions in order to ensure the sustainable and rational use of freshwater for all.

“This gift will spark new approaches to environmental challenges that cannot be solved in silos. Effective solutions in this sphere require rigorous science, informed citizens, and wise policy,” said H. Vincent Poor, dean of Princeton’s School of Engineering and Applied Science. “We are very grateful for the generosity and vision of Louis Bacon and the Moore Charitable Foundation.”

With support from the Science-to-Action Fund, Princeton faculty and students will partner with experts from leading conservation organizations, including the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, to conduct research aimed at solving challenges associated with freshwater ecosystems and species conservation, particularly in North Carolina and New York. Research teams will include students as well as scientists, engineers, and policy experts.

“I look forward to seeing the impact of many talented people collaborating to protect our environment,” said Louis Bacon, founder and chairman of the Moore Charitable Foundation and its affiliate foundations. “There is no better way to support conservation than by investing in the next generation of environmental leaders.”

Professor Peter Jaffe (right) discovered a soil bacterium that could help clean contamination from groundwater. Here Jaffe and colleagues collect soil samples from the Assunpink Wildlife Management Area in New Jersey where the bacterium was originally discovered. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Professor Peter Jaffe (right) discovered a soil bacterium that could help clean contamination from groundwater. Here Jaffe and colleagues collect soil samples from the Assunpink Wildlife Management Area in New Jersey where the bacterium was originally discovered. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

About Princeton University and the School of Engineering and Applied Science
Princeton University is a vibrant community of scholarship and learning. Faculty and students in the School of Engineering and Applied Science pursue fundamental knowledge as well as multidisciplinary collaborations to solve societal challenges, including improving human health, developing sustainable energy, and protecting the environment.

About the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation protects and restores wildlife and habitats in the United States. Chartered by Congress in 1984, it directs public conservation dollars to the most pressing environmental needs and matches those investments with private contributions. The foundation works with government, nonprofit and corporate partners to find solutions for the most intractable conservation challenges.

About Louis Bacon and the Moore Charitable Foundation
Louis Bacon is a conservation philanthropist who has spent more than two decades supporting efforts to protect natural resources in the United States and abroad. Mr. Bacon is the founder and chairman of the Moore Charitable Foundation, Inc. (MCF) and its affiliate foundations across North America, spanning southern Colorado, northern New Mexico, eastern North Carolina, The Bahamas, Panama and Long Island, New York. Mr. Bacon founded MCF in 1992. MCF supports conservation nonprofits and community programs that focus on protecting threatened landscapes, habitats, and water bodies across the world. MCF works with conservation experts and leaders and has provided significant funding to more than 200 local, national, and international environmental organizations.

Read more at Princeton University’s website.