Oceana

“With the support of The Moore Charitable Foundation, Oceana has built, and continues to build, broad public opposition to seismic airgun blasting throughout the Atlantic, with a special focus on North Carolina. This work will prevent harmful oil and gas exploration and development on these unique and vibrant coasts. Our innovative partnership with The Moore Charitable Foundation has resulted in the passage of 14 resolutions by city and town councils in North Carolina coastal communities, and the passage of nearly 60 resolutions along the Atlantic Coast. By helping to give a voice to coastal communities, we can sound the alarm so it’s heard by the President, and prevent oil exploration and development in the Atlantic. ” – Claire Douglass, Campaign Director, Climate and Energy, Oceana

Oceana is an international organization focused on restoring the resilience, diversity and abundance of the world’s oceans. The Orton Foundation supports Oceana’s campaign of opposition to offshore drilling and seismic airgun testing, demonstrating an ongoing commitment to the defense of coastal communities and economies, and marine areas.

Offshore drilling increases the risk of toxic exposure from oil contamination to wildlife and coastal communities, and contributes to economic losses and climate change. Offshore drilling operations are a source of insidious leaks, and catastrophic spills and blowouts. Along the Atlantic coast, nearly 1.4 million jobs and over $95 billion in gross domestic product rely on healthy ocean ecosystems, mainly through fishing, tourism and recreation.


Oceana Victory: No Oil Drilling in the Atlantic

In 2016, the Obama Administration through the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management protected areas of the Atlantic Ocean from Offshore Drilling by removing it for leasing from the five-year program for oil and gas development on the Outer Continental Shelf. In early 2017 Obama also denied all pending permits for seismic airgun blasting in the Atlantic Ocean. Oil companies use the data from seismic testing to identify possible oil reserves in the oceans. Seismic airguns fire incredibly loud blasts of compressed air that are one of the loudest human-made sounds in the ocean, and are repeated every ten seconds for days to months on end. These blasts pose a major threat to marine life, as the profound level of noise damages hearing and disrupts navigation and communication. According to government estimates, use of airguns in the Atlantic could injure as many as 138,000 marine mammals, including dolphins and the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale

Learn more about Oceana here.